Menopause weight gain: Stop the middle age spread! AGH!!!

by admin on June 27, 2012

Most women gain weight as they age, but excess pounds aren't inevitable. To minimize menopause weight gain, step up your activity level and enjoy a healthy diet.

This post is near and dear to me…I myself am dealing with this NOW!!!! A little bit of background about me; I have been teaching health and fitness for over 20 years. I will be 49 in July and I have been exercising all my life. At this point I am seeing changes in my body that I am not happy about. But for me, I have to step it up a huge notch because I have this base of fitness. When I see others start a fitness program and get great results I feel kinda jealous. I can't get quick results like that any more, I need to kick it up. And plus, I also feel as if I have been exercising for a long time, I still instruct classes 4 times a week, I am more prone to over use injuries.

So with that said, I know I have to kick it up and I am sure I am not the only one in this boat!

So I had to do my research and I want to share it with my fellow ladies out  there!!

As you get older, you may notice that maintaining your usual weight becomes more difficult. In fact, the most profound weight gain in a woman's life tends to happen during the years leading up to menopause (perimenopause). Weight gain after menopause isn't inevitable, however. You can reverse course by paying attention to healthy-eating habits and leading an active lifestyle.

What causes menopause weight gain?

The hormonal changes of menopause may make you more likely to gain weight around your abdomen, rather than your hips and thighs. Hormonal changes alone don't necessarily trigger weight gain after menopause, however. Instead, the weight gain is usually related to a variety of lifestyle and genetic factors.

For example, menopausal women tend to exercise less than other women, which can lead to weight gain. In addition, muscle mass naturally diminishes with age. If you don't do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose, your body composition will shift to more fat and less muscle — which slows down the rate at which you burn calories. If you continue to eat as you always have, you're likely to gain weight.

For many women, genetic factors play a role in weight gain after menopause. If your parents or other close relatives carry extra weight around the abdomen, you're likely to do the same. Sometimes, factors such as children leaving — or returning smiley — home, divorce, the death of a spouse or other life changes may contribute to weight gain after menopause. For others, a sense of contentment or simply letting go leads to weight gain. No, don't do it!

How risky is weight gain after menopause?

Weight gain after menopause can have serious implications for your health. Excess weight increases the risk of high cholesterol, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. In turn, these conditions increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Excess weight also increases the risk of various types of cancer, including colorectal cancer and breast cancer. In fact, some research suggests that gaining as little as 4.4 pounds (2 kilograms) at age 50 or later could increase the risk of breast cancer by 30 percent. Those are some pretty scary numbers!

What's the best way to prevent weight gain after menopause?

There's no magic formula for preventing — or reversing — weight gain after menopause. Simply stick to weight-control basics:

  • Move more. Aerobic activity can help you shed excess pounds or simply maintain a healthy weight. Strength training counts, too. As you gain muscle, your body burns calories more efficiently — which makes it easier to control your weight. As a general goal, include at least 30 minutes of physical activity in your daily routine and do strength training exercises at least twice a week. If you want to lose weight or meet specific fitness goals, you may need to increase your activity even more.
  • Eat less. To maintain your current weight — let alone lose excess pounds — you may need about 200 fewer calories a day during your 50s than you did during your 30s and 40s. To reduce calories without skimping on nutrition, pay attention to what you're eating and drinking. Choose more fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Opt for lean sources of protein. Don't skip meals, which may lead you to overeat later.
  • Seek support. Surround yourself with friends and loved ones who'll support your efforts to eat a healthy diet and increase your physical activity. Better yet, team up and make the lifestyle changes together. I have challenge groups that are so awesome! Support is key!

The bottom line? Successful weight loss at any stage of life requires permanent changes in diet and exercise habits. Take a brisk walk every day. Try a yoga class. Trade cookies for fresh fruit. Share restaurant meals with a friend. Commit to the changes and enjoy a healthier you!

 

Maria DiCroce has been in the Health and Wellness industry for over 20 years. Fitness became a passion after attending some local fitness clubs and she became hooked. Always athletic, fitness was second nature. While working as a medical assistant and perfecting phlebotomy it was apparent that she was drawn more and more to the fitness arena. Getting certified with The American College of Sport Medicine – ACSM and AFAA, she decided to follow her passion to help people reach their health and fitness goals with personal training , group fitness  and personal fitness coaching.

 

 

 

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